Tag Archive: plants

Exploring the garden

In the Pont-ager, I saw how the garden evolved through winter and it made me feel like something beautiful was happening right in front of my eyes. I also saw how insects, spiders and earthworms explored the garden and contributed to its living aspect.
Text and photo by Mehdi-Lou.

Pushing the boundaries


I didn’t know Artichokes were that huge! This plant might have seen better days, but I like how it nonchalantly trickles out from its patch, while dry vines dramatically spread over the fences… It quite epitomizes the idea that nature will always push the boundaries humans try to impose on it. Text and photo by Theïlo.

Symbiosis

I was surprised by the symbiosis between those two trees, one strong supporting and protecting a more stunted with delicate white flowers. Text and photo by Raphaël.

Invisible World

When one looks at 1 square meter of this place, one cannot see a piece of art, but a small “piece of life”. Hundreds of species are flying on the surface or slithering under the weeds and the “jardin pontanique” is like a huge window on this invisible world. – Text and photos by Charles-Auguste.

Curry plant

The plant you can see on the picture is often called the « curry plant », for its strong smell really close to curry powder. It is impressive to see how strong a smell can be and that it can remind us of many tastes we know. During Summer, little yellow flowers are supposed to bloom, we can’t wait to see that!
Text and picture by Joy-Rose

Sage


Here’s a plant that grows between a rosemary bush and the orange thyme. I is not very high ( about 20 or 30 cm) nor does it have a particular smell. But I chose it for its leaves, their colour and their texture. The leaves are not just green, but also have some grey and blue, and are very pale. If you take them in your hands they are soft as velvet.
Text and photo by Marguerite.



Rhubarb

lthough tiny at this moment of the year, Rhubarb grows really big in summer. You should want to cook it before eating it because its natural taste is quite sour. It is often used for cooking pies but it can also be stewed or dried in some sort of candy. – Photo by Hannes

Sage

Throughout history, sage has been praised for its numerous benefits, and has even been called the “sacred herb”.
The Romans and Gauls used it to help women to give birth and to prevent many diseases. Its use continued throughout the Middle Age until today. Indeed, many kings saw it as a way to extend their life and protect themselves from diseases. Native Americans use it in the smudging ceremony to bless
people and places and to clear out of their bad spirits.
Sage has many medicinal properties. It reduces belly aches, tackles difficult digestion, treats gum infections, calms hot flushes, reduces cholesterol levels, and helps to regulate insulin levels. Some researchers even pointed out in 2003 that it may be useful to prevent Alzheimer’s disease.

How to use it:
It can be used in the kitchen to enhance many dishes and sauces thanks to its savory and peppery flavor, when cut into small pieces.
Also, you can boil sages leaves and drink them as an herbal tea for 2 weeks to treat aches. Beware of not consuming too much though, because this triggers hot flushes and headaches (but this is very rare). (photo and text by Inès)

Numerous plants

Text and photos by Huly.

Garden visit

When we went to the garden, it was cold and cloudy. There wasn’t that much noise except the sound of wind and a crow.
Despite bad weather, the garden was quite nice thanks to vegetation. I enjoyed the smell of different plants such as rosemary, thyme, lavander, jasmine, santalina… Photos and text by Mathilde L.