Tag Archive: jardin

Herbs and alcohol

From Matthieu: I’ve taken this picture of chartreuse because I’m fascinated in the alcohol created with herbs.

Captivating petals

From Nawfal:

Despite its  beautiful captivating petals, my fingers got hurt by a thorn when I tried to hold its stem. This made me think of all the subtle techniques that nature uses in order to protect itselfNawfal.

Red plants

From: Suzanne 

I took a photo of some leaves on the top of little tree that were red. There is not a lot of red in the garden, that’s why it struck me. There was one of the only red roses of the garden next to it and it was as if the little group of leaves wanted to imitate it.

The garden has an impressive diversity and even if at a first sight it seems to be dead and dry, it contains a lot of flowers and beasts. Why not to put a lemon verbena tea tree in itSuzanne?

Fall reflections – We Are What We Eat

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Our new students from We Are What We Eat discovered the garden for the first time and took pictures of things they found interesting.

This is the first of many posts of their findings.

From Valentin:
I took pictures of mint and dill herb, because these plants are easy to maintain and are useful in the kitchen. Dill can add flavour to a dish and with fresh mint we can make tea. Everyone could easily grow these plants in pots, or on the edge of a window for example.

One last dig

Our school year is drawing to a close and we’re probably having one last dig with the students before everyone leaves on their internships. There was more potato hilling, border repair and onion and rhubarb distribution. We hope to see everyone again in the fall.

And it was a sunny day foimg_3339.jpg img_3338.jpg img_3340.jpgimg_3333.jpg img_3343.jpg img_3342.jpg img_3345.jpg img_3346.jpg img_3348.jpg img_3347.jpgr it.

Little Worker

bee - RemiPhoto of a little worker of the garden, keeping it alive by its invisible but vital job.

Photo and comments by Rémi.

Adaptable

This flower is a beautiful purple periwinkle which grows at 20-30 centimeters from the ground. This plant has a very important foliage that covers the ground. The periwinkle is very adaptable to the surrounding conditions. It can grow in shade or in the sun and adapts to almost any type of soil. Photo and comments by Kilian.
Photo_jardin Killian

Triple project event

Friday was a day of poetry, invention and medicinals in the garden. Three different project groups from the English section shared their work on a lovely sunny if pollenous afternoon. We had Wordsworth and Dickenson, thyme jelly and cold angelica tea and inaugurated the « indestructable » information stand made from a reused bridge structure and pallet wood. There was a fun exchange about allergies and lots of shared kleenexes before the rain which cleared the sky.IMG_9659 IMG_9661 IMG_9662 IMG_9663 IMG_9664 IMG_9646 IMG_9647 IMG_9649 IMG_9651 IMG_9654 IMG_9656

Spring planting

The We Are What We Eat students got our beans, potatoes and artichoke plants in the ground today after recovering the garden from the waist-high weeds. (Thanks ID Vert). It also gave me the occasion to explain the difference between weeds and weed, especially when someone confused the fake strawberry plants for the latter. It appears that no one had any fun at all (or maybe just a little…) IMG_9443 IMG_9445 IMG_9446 IMG_9447 IMG_9448 IMG_9450 IMG_9452 IMG_9453

Readings and Tastings

IMG_5937IMG_5931IMG_5929IMG_5925IMG_5923IMG_5946IMG_5941IMG_5944For the DLC Days, the Jardin hosted to the Book Club which read excerpts from Lewis Carroll to Ray Bradbury to Shakespeare. Parched from the sun and the willow fluff blowing around, Speaking Near and Far folks had an aromatic herb syrup taste test for the participants and the audience. Trying to recognize the subtle perfumes of rosemary, thyme, lemon balm and mint tickling our tongues, was a great game for a sunny afternoon.